Regenerating the Soil Carbon Sponge – Walter Jehne

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Build Soil Organic Matter with Brown-rot Fungi

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Spatial Heterogeneity of SOM Concentrations Associated with White-rot Versus Brown-rot Wood Decay. – PubMed – NCBI

The brown-rot fungal wood decay resulted in higher concentrations of soil C and N and a greater increase in microbial necromass (i.e., 1.3- to 1.7-fold greater) than the white-rot fungal wood decay. The white-rot sets were accompanied by significant differences in the proportions of the bacterial residue index (muramic acid%) with soil depth; however, the brown-rot-associated soils showed complementary shifts, primarily in fungal necromass, across horizontal distances. Soil C and N concentrations were significantly correlated with fungal rather than bacterial necromass in the brown-rot systems. Our findings confirmed that the brown-rot fungi-dominated degradation of lignocellulosic residues resulted in a greater SOM buildup than the white-rot fungi-dominated degradation.

Composting Biochar Creates 200 Nanometer Organic Coating

This won’t be news to the one person following this blog but researchers have now quantified the result of composting biochar.

Researchers found that dissolved organic substances played a key role in the composting of biochar and created the thin organic coating.

“This organic coating makes the difference between fresh and composted biochar,” Kappler said. “The coating improves the biochar’s properties of storing nutrients and forming further organic soil substances.” Hagemann added that the coating also developed when untreated biochar was introduced into the soil — only much more slowly.

Organic carbon coating gives composted biochar a boost

Study:

Organic coating on biochar explains its nutrient retention and stimulation of soil fertility

Rather than composting I prefer soaking my biochar in organic liquids like aged urine (nitrogen and phosphorus), worm tea (plant growth hormones), and compost/extracts.