Why microbes sometimes fail to break down organic carbon in soils

A new study has found that:

In oxygen-starved places such as marshes and in floodplains, microorganisms do not equally break down all of the available organic matter. Instead, carbon compounds that do not provide enough energy to be worthwhile for microorganisms to degrade end up accumulating. This passed-over carbon, however, does not necessarily stay locked away below ground in the long run. Being water soluble, the carbon can seep into nearby oxygen-rich waterways, where microbes readily consume it.

Tests found that, in contrast to the layers where oxygen was available, leftover carbon compounds in the sediment samples where sulfur had been used for respiration instead of oxygen were mostly of the sort that requires more energy to degrade than would be liberated through the degradation itself. Making these carbon compounds of no use, then, to growing microbes, and had remained within the deeper sediment layers.

Shunned by microbes, organic carbon can resist breakdown in underground environments, Stanford scientists say | Stanford School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Why microbes sometimes fail to break down organic carbon in soils

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s